Open Evening 2018

I’m really proud of Churchill. Every day I’m happy to go to work, knowing that I’ll be surrounded by such a dedicated and passionate staff team, and our amazing, creative, funny and lovely students. On the days when I’m away from the Academy for meetings, I miss it!

Open Evening is a wonderful opportunity to show other people what I have the privilege of seeing every day. It’s a chance to showcase our wonderful school to children and their families who are interested in coming to Churchill in Year 7. This year, more than ever, there was a real sense of the whole Academy pulling together as one team, students and staff united, so proud of our school.

I was especially proud of Ben and Dulcie who opened the presentation to parents and students, and of Lily, Tiri, David and Mary who finished the presentation off. They spoke confidently and so warmly about their time at Churchill to the packed houses in the Academy Hall. Our student tour guides were also excellent ambassadors for the school, answering questions and making sure that no stone was left unturned. The ever-brilliant Youthful Spirit Gospel Choir gave an uplifting performance too!

Next week we have our Open Mornings when we will showcase the Academy on a normal working day. We can’t wait! All the details are on the Academy website.

Celebrating success

This Wednesday was our annual Presentation Evening. This fantastic event is the partner to our end-of-year Celebration of Success evenings, with the focus on those students who have excelled in their GCSE and A-level exam results over the summer. However, we recognise that school is about more than just the examination results that young people achieve, so it is also vital that we award prizes for service to the community, for progress and improvement, for compassion, for resilience, and above all for excellent and improved attitudes to learning over the course of the last year.

This year’s guest of honour was the wonderful Stefanie Martini. Stefanie was a student at Churchill from 2002 to 2009, leaving us to pursue an Art Foundation course, before applying to RADA to pursue acting. From there, Stefanie landed a role as Mary Thorne in Julian Fellowes’ Doctor Thorne for ITV, as well as the mysterious Lady Ev in the NBC fantasy series Emerald City, set in the world of the Wizard of Oz. She is perhaps best known for playing the role of a young Jane Tennison in Prime Suspect 1973, showing us the origins as a probationary police officer of the iconic Detective Inspector Tennison that Dame Helen Mirren brought to ITV in the 1990s. Her latest film, Hurricane, tells the story of Squadron 303, a group of Polish airmen who fought with the RAF in the Battle of Britain, fighting both prejudice on the ground as well as the Luftwaffe in the air. It is in cinemas now!

IMG_3476

Prize winners with Stefanie Martini, 12th September 2018

Stefanie spoke about her time at Churchill, and how it shaped the character that she has become. She explained how, when she fell behind with school work, she was supported and pushed to get back on track, and how failing to get the part she wanted in the school musical made her a better actress. There was a thread of steely determination running through her speech: despite being rejected seven times in one year from drama schools, she kept going – and in the next year, she was accepted to four different drama schools at once. Her message of self-belief, strength of character and the importance of pushing yourself out of your comfort zone in order to move forward was hugely inspiring to the young people (and the adults!) at the event.

It’s great to have alumni back at Churchill to speak to this year’s prize-winners. Not only does it show our current and only-just-left students what is possible with a Churchill education, but it is also a great opportunity to celebrate the success of students who – although they have left – always remain part of our school community.

Of course, a prize-giving ceremony can only have one prize winner in each category. Even though we gave out 139 prizes at this year’s Presentation Evening, there are hundreds, even thousands, of achievements, triumphs and successes that we don’t have a prize for, that don’t get their picture in the paper or their name in the newsletter. What I hope, however, is that we do recognise and celebrate those successes, however small, whenever and wherever we find them – because nobody ever tires of being told “well done.”

Why are we here?

It’s great to be back for a new year at Churchill! In my start-of-term assembly for each of the Houses, I outlined some practical priorities: some of the key changes to the Academy site which will be taking place this year, and reminders about our expectations of behaviour and conduct.

At the start of the year, however, my most important priority was to take a longer and wider view, and to remind all students why were are here, and what we are trying to achieve together at Churchill.

Our purpose: to inspire and enable young people to make a positive difference

 

kenya2018(school)

Churchill students working with young people at Rigoma Primary and Secondary School in Kenya, summer 2018 (source)

Our purpose at Churchill is “to inspire and enable young people to make a positive difference.” This can be at a personal level: we can all make a positive difference to ourselves, through the work we do to improve our knowledge, skills and character every day. We can also make a positive difference to others, through helping them when they are finding things difficult and making their experience of school better.

On a wider scale, we can all make a positive difference to the Academy community. This can be in simple, practical ways like keeping the site neat and tidy, but also in less obvious ways by contributing to our positive atmosphere: behaving kindly and respectfully; being ready and eager to learn; and supporting and encouraging one another in our efforts to improve.

Looking up still further, we know that all our young people can make a positive difference in the wider world, both during their time as students here but also after they have left us. Our hope is that, because of the education they have had here, Churchill students will go on to make the world a better place. This is a lofty ambition – but it is what motivates and guides us in the work we do every day.

Our vision: to set no limits on what we can achieve

Churchill sports Day 29th June  2018

Sports Day 2018

Our vision at Churchill is “to set no limits on what we can achieve.” Limits can be external, with other people telling you that “you’ll never be able to do X,” or “you’re only capable of Y.” We strive to avoid this kind of talk at Churchill, recognising that it is impossible to know someone’s true potential, and that effort and application make it far more likely that we will achieve our goals.

The limits we set ourselves can be far more challenging. We all have a voice inside ourselves that says “it’s too hard,” or “I’ll never be able to do it,” or “I can’t.” At Churchill we try hard to find an inner voice to talk back in, so that we can find a way to overcome those barriers we can set ourselves.

GM Phrases

Our values: kindness, curiosity, determination

Valuescropped

Our three values are based on the character strengths that underpin our vision and our purpose. Developing kindness, curiosity and determination will help us all to reach our goals. Each value reflects a different aspect of our character: kindness is a strength of the heart; curiosity is a strength of the mind; determination is a strength of the will.

Kindness

At Churchill, we are kind to one another. This means that we are considerate and generous every day, caring for one another and doing everything we can to make sure everybody else has a good day at school. Kindness reinforces our shared sense of community; it builds trust and respect; and it ensures that we take our social responsibilities seriously.

“A single act of kindness throws out roots in all directions, and the roots spring up and make new trees.” (Amelia Earhart)

Curiosity

At Churchill, we are constantly curious and hungry for new learning. We value enquiring minds and a spirit of exploration. The desire to know or learn something new motivates us to try our hardest in everything we do.

“The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled” (Plutarch)

Determination

At Churchill, we are persistent and relentless in the pursuit of our goals – both academic and personal. This determination to keep going when learning is difficult, and to come back and try again when we struggle, helps us to succeed.

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.” (Thomas Edison)

It is the interplay between our values, our vision and our purpose that enable us to achieve success. I’m looking forward, this year, to taking further strides towards our shared goals. As Henry Ford said, “if everyone is moving forward together, success takes care of itself.”

Feeling proud

proudbaby

The “proud baby” meme: one of my favourites!

Pride is a tricky concept. In Christianity, Pride is one of the seven deadly sins, thought by many to be the original and most serious of all. It is characterised as the excessive admiration of the personal image or self; in other words, thinking that you’re better than everybody else, or better than you actually are. Pride underpins the tragic flaw of hubris in many dramatic heroes. Pride comes before a fall, the saying goes; it is something to be avoided, something to be ashamed of.

More recently, though, the term has shifted in its meaning. Pride is no longer something to be ashamed of; instead, it has gathered positive connotations. The Pride festivals which celebrate the LGBTQ+ community are fantastic demonstrations of societies which are inclusive and accepting of diversity. Feeling proud of what you’ve achieved is no longer something to be ashamed of – provided we stay grounded and humble, we should be proud of ourselves. It seems that the idea of “Pride” more generally has been reclaimed from its negative associations to be more positive – a feeling of rightful satisfaction at a job well done.

southgate1

Gareth Southgate

Like many of you, I felt really proud of the England team at Russia 2018. The last time an England men’s football team reached the semi-final of a World Cup, I was at secondary school myself, in Year 10. I hope our current Year 10s don’t have to wait as long as I have for this to happen again! It’s been a long time since a national men’s football side has been so successful (although the women’s team finished third in the 2015 World Cup!), and Gareth Southgate’s words after the extra-time defeat to Croatia really resonated with me:

“I’m remarkably proud of a group of players who have really advanced, and no one could have given any more. The way they’ve represented their country has been exemplary. I couldn’t be prouder of what they’ve done.”

I think it was the combination of rightful pride with genuine humility that got me. Southgate’s words resonated because he articulated the way that I feel about the students at Churchill. I’m so proud of the progress they’ve made this year, the progress that we’ve made at the Academy. I’m proud of those students that have put their all into their studies, their school work, and the wider activities that make up school life. I’m proud of the way they represent the Academy, acting as ambassadors for Churchill in their time here and when they are out on trips, visits and activities. I couldn’t be prouder of what they’ve done.

In my assembly I shared some of the proud moments from the year. I cannot possibly capture all of them, but just a few of them are pictured below.

Churchill is a school full of children with boundless promise and potential. They have a expert, dedicated and caring staff team around them, backed by a supportive community of family and friends. The young people in those pictures – and the hundreds beyond them! – are grasping  the opportunities in front of them with both hands, and growing in knowledge, skills, character and confidence every day. What the pictures capture for me is a happy school. Looking back at the year gone by, I think I have every right to feel unashamedly proud of what we’ve done this year – and, at the same time, excited to think that next year will be even better.

I wish you all a restful summer holiday. See you in September!

Activities Week 2018

We’ve reached the end of another great activities week! It’s been a privilege to visit activities and take in the huge range on offer to our students, from the creative to the technical, practical, theoretical and physical, here at the Academy, out in the local community, or further afield. Our Year 10 students have been completing their week-long work experience placements, whilst residential trips this year have included the surf trip to Cornwall, a stay in London, the History trip to Belgium, the Gospel Choir Tour to Austria, the Spanish trip to Barcelona, and the Geography trip to the Azores. The Duke of Edinburgh Silver expedition went to Dartmoor, and the Gold expedition left today for Snowdonia!

The aim of Activities Week is to provide students with experiences beyond the classroom which enrich and extend their education. We know that the taught curriculum – the lessons the students have day in day out through the year – is the core of our work, but we also know that this broader offer is a vital part of our mission as a school. The activities build skills such as teamwork, problem solving, creativity, leadership, confidence and positivity. Past students often tell us that the memories made on Activities Week are those that stay with them the longest, and we’re proud to provide these opportunities for students.

Below are just a few pictures from Activities Week 2018. We don’t have all the pictures back from the foreign trips yet – they will be added to the gallery on the Academy website when we get them!

Of course, the week wouldn’t happen without the dedication and commitment of all the staff, and the students who also commit themselves fully to their experience. Special mention must go to Miss Thorne in the finance office, and to Mrs Cadman who coordinates the whole week. Thank you!

Summer Term: Succession

I love the summer term – it’s a time when the Academy community really comes together to celebrate what we have here at Churchill. We’ve seen that over recent weeks with our Sports Day, the Year 11 and Year 13 Balls, and the Music Festival which ran on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week. At the same time, we look forward to the future as we begin the process of thinking about succession into the new academic year.

New Leaders

Group Picture A3

Academy House Captains 2018

It’s been my privilege over the last week to begin to work with the new House Captains for 2018-19. These students were selected by Heads of House from the mound of strong applications received. The House Captains have a vital role within their house, supporting the Heads of House in ensuring things run smoothly and that students are well looked after. Together, the House Captains also form the Student Leadership Team at the Academy, and will meet regularly with me in dialogue about the progress the Academy is making, things that are going well and things that we can improve. This year’s House Captains have made an excellent start, ensuring that Sports Day was the huge success it was, and running our transition events for the new Year 7 with kindness, care and calm. I look forward to the year ahead with these students.

New Year 7

bright-future-ahead

This week we have had two days with the new Year 7 who start in September 2018. The Transition Day on Tuesday saw our new intake work really hard to demonstrate the Academy’s values of kindness, curiosity and determination. They impressed the staff, and the other students, with their approach to their learning and their life at Churchill. I have a very good feeling about this year group, and I am sure they will be an asset to the Academy as they join us in September.

New Sixth Formers

Churchill school June  2018

Our Sixth Formers enjoying the summer sunshine

On Thursday we had our induction day for our new Sixth Form students. Many of  our own Year 11 were joined by a strong group of students who have applied to join us from other schools. Students spend the day with us on an orientation programme, having initial lessons in each of their chosen subjects and learning about the expectations, people and processes of the Sixth Form. Again, the students impressed us with their “ready to learn” attitude and Mr Morgan and his team are really looking forward to welcoming them into the Sixth Form.

New Staff

It’s also been fantastic over recent weeks to welcome new staff to the Academy – some who have already started and more who will be joining us in September. We have new teachers in English, Maths, PE, Science, Geography, and History starting next year. Although we are in the midst of a well-publicised shortage of teachers nationally, I’ve been really impressed by the calibre of teaching staff applicants to join our team. I am proud to confirm Churchill is fully staffed with expert subject specialists in every department for September, and I look forward to the future with great excitement about what we can accomplish together.

Transforming the learning environment

Over the past fortnight students have been getting used to a new and improved learning environment in the English department. Over the past year our site team have been working tirelessly, room-by-room, to renovate and refurbish all the classrooms in Hanover, where English is based. Over the Easter break, new carpet was laid in all classrooms and the upstairs corridor. It’s made an amazing difference!

IMG_1022

Before…

20180212_094246_resized

…during…

IMG_2006

…and after

What was once an echoing tiled space is now a quiet, padded corridor. Whereas once the slightest shift of a chair was accompanied by an ear-splitting shriek of metal on tile, now students can focus on their learning without distraction. The clutter of old resources has been removed in favour of neat storage, and classroom displays are now focused on key learning points for English classes.

IMG_2008IMG_2007

The classroom design uses the same template as the Alan Turing Building, based on the Smarter Spaces research and work conducted by our students last year. The “teaching wall” is painted in a bright accent colour, to draw attention to the front of the room. The other walls are in a neutral colour, free from distractions, so that focus remains where it should be – on the learning.

Corridors are now clean and uncluttered. Hard-to-maintain displays have been removed in favour of large, robust photography. The time teachers would have spent on preparing, putting up and maintaining displays can now be spent more effectively on lessons and working with students.

We now have two buildings – the Alan Turing Building and Hanover – in this new internal design. The Athene Donald Building will make a third, and over the coming years we will also roll out the design to Windsor, Stuart and beyond. The future is bright!

We have only been able to achieve these great results thanks to the amazing efforts of our site team, who have completed this work with minimal disruption and a great end result. I’d like to thank them personally for all the work they have done – and continue to do – to transform the environment for learning for our students.

How do the new GCSE grades work: 2018 update

Last April I wrote “How do the new GCSE grades work” to explain about the introduction of 9-1 grades for GCSE Maths and English. This year, 9-1 grades will be used in awarding a much wider range of GCSEs, with only a few remaining on the A*-G system. This blog provides an update on the new grading system for the class of 2018.

To help people understand the grading system, Ofqual (the exams regulator) have published this video:

The new 9-1 grades equate to the old A*-G grades as follows:

newgcsegrades

In combined Science GCSE (Double Science), candidates will get two number grades in a variety of combinations as shown below:

sciencegrades

GCSE Double Award Science grades from 2018

In other words, double Science students will get results like 7-7, 7-6, 6-6, 6-5 and so on.

How are the grades awarded?

GCSE grades are awarded after all the exam marking has taken place.

Exams and coursework are marked according to the mark schemes issued by the examination boards. These only have numerical marks on – exams and coursework aren’t graded by markers. When all the marks for everyone who has taken the subject in the country are in, then the grade boundaries are decided according to a formula, so that roughly similar proportions of students nationally get each grade in each subject each year.

In other words, your grade at GCSE in the new system doesn’t just depend on how well you have done – it depends on how well you have done relative to all the other candidates in the country taking the same GCSE as you. If you are the top 20% of candidates in the grade 7 and above group, you will be awarded a grade 9. If you are outside that, you won’t. This will not be the same each year, and will change with each new group of students taking the exams every year.

This is significant because it means that if, nationally, lots of children do very well in the exam, the grade boundaries will move up. If it is a hard exam, and students nationally do not do as well, the boundaries will move down. This makes it difficult for teachers to predict grades accurately; we have to make our best professional judgment on the information available to us.

What does this mean for students?

loverevision

The changes mean that it is impossible for teachers to say “if you do this you will definitely get a grade 5 or above,” because getting a grade 5 depends on how well everyone else in the country does relative to how well you have done. We can’t possibly know how well everyone else in the country has done or is going to do, so all we can do is teach you to get better and better at your own Maths, English, Science, History, Geography and all your other subjects, until you sit the GCSE exam. You have to keep working and pushing yourself to achieve more because what was good enough for a grade 7 last year won’t necessarily be good enough for a grade 7 this year. Don’t settle! You need to keep improving so that you go into the exam at the end of Year 11 fully prepared and confident that you are the best at each subject that you can possibly be – and then you will get the grade that you deserve.

Remember there are posts on this blog to help you to revise effectively, and you can  download our guide to helping your child revise here.

Good luck!

Pass me the wrecking ball!

As regular readers of this blog will know, we have been engaged in a three-phase project to replace the original 1956 school building, known as Tudor Block. In April 2016, we were awarded Phase 1: £1.3 million to build the Alan Turing Building for Business Studies, Computing and Social Sciences, which opened in June 2017. In April 2017, we were awarded Phase 2: £3.9 million to build the Athene Donald Building for Science and Technology, which is now under construction. On 29th March this year, we received the now familiar email regarding Phase 3…

Dear Colleague,

Thank you for applying to the Condition Improvement Fund (CIF) 2018 to 2019.

We received requests for more than £1.5 billion for over 4,600 projects in this year’s round. Following our assessment of applications, we have announced £514 million for 1,556 projects at 1,299 academies and sixth-form colleges.

You can view the full list of successful projects at…

And, thankfully, our third phase bid was also successful – £750,000 to demolish the Tudor block and “make good” the footprint of the building. We aim to put car parking in its place, which we hope will improve the safety of our students and members of the community on the narrow roads around the Academy by reducing congestion from on-road parking. Planning is already in place, and we will be working hard with the contractors to minimise disruption and produce the best possible outcome from the works, which are due to be completed in the middle of 2019.

Andrew Frappel - boys pic 1958

Part of the Tudor Building can be seen in the background of this, the earliest school photo we have found,  courtesy of alumnus Andrew Frappell who joined the school in 1958.

This is a landmark moment for the Academy. The Tudor Block was the first building to be constructed as part of the new secondary school for Churchill in 1956, and it has formed the core of the school’s facilities for many years. However, after 60 years in service it is no longer fit for purpose, and all of the classrooms from T1 onwards will be demolished. The current reception, offices, main hall and gym will remain intact.

0846_001

This aerial shot from 1970 shows the original Tudor block in the right of the picture.

The removal of this building will mean a change of shape to the site, and we will be working hard over the coming year to review and redevelop our provision to accommodate this new emphasis. It’s an exciting time, and the culmination of a lot of work from a huge team of people. Particular thanks are due to Deputy Headteacher Mark Branch, who has coordinated and led the third phase of the project with great skill – and will continue to do so as the demolition progresses.

Slide10

Satellite picture of our site captured in 2016, prior to commencement of the three-phase project. The Tudor block is the T-shaped building towards the top of the picture.  

Closing for a snow day

Deciding on whether the Academy should be open or closed in the event of adverse weather is one of those decisions which rests solely with me, the Headteacher. This week I have had to make that decision, and I thought it might be helpful to blog about how and why it was made.

IMG_1792

Snow falling at Churchill

Closing the school is highly disruptive. It gets in the way of lessons and learning, but also all of the events, meetings, interviews, activities and discussions that have been planned, often well in advance. We have nearly 1500 students, so the decision to close has an impact on hundreds and hundreds of families across our communities. It is not a decision I can take lightly. Whatever I decide will please some and frustrate others.

This week’s cold weather and snowfall was no surprise. The “beast from the east” was well-advertised. I received twice-daily updates from the delegated services team, providing risk analysis based on the changing weather forecast from the Met Office. North Somerset Council re-published their advice about what to do in case of closure. Senior staff at the Academy ran through the procedures and processes in case we had to close- although we hoped we wouldn’t have to.

The question I ask myself in this situation is: “is it safe to open the school?”

reflection 1

Year 13 Photography students took the opportunity to get some snow shots on Thursday morning

Most of our students travel to school on buses, many from rural communities. Our staff – nearly 150 adults – travel in from across the region. Would it be safe for students and staff to travel? If staff are unable to get into school, will I have enough adults to ensure that students are properly supervised and have access to the high-quality teaching to which they are accustomed and entitled? Will the site be safe?

By Wednesday it became clear that the snow was coming. The Met Office shifted their Amber warning to early afternoon on Thursday. The Chief Forecaster’s assessment read:

Widespread snow is expected to develop through Thursday afternoon and evening, accompanied by strong easterly winds, leading to drifting of lying snow in places. Around 10-20 cm is likely to fall quite widely, with the potential for up to 50 cm over parts of Dartmoor and Exmoor. As less cold air follows from the south, there is a chance of snow turning to freezing rain in places, with widespread icy stretches forming making driving conditions dangerous. The warning has been updated to reflect the growing confidence of a severe spell of weather.

I consulted during the day with my senior team, primary Headteachers in the Churchill cluster, and local secondary Headteachers. By early evening, it was clear that the worst of the weather was forecast for the afternoon of the next day – Thursday. Our usual closing time – 3:20pm – was right in the middle of the heaviest forecast snowfall and high winds were predicted to make the air temperature of -4°C feel like -12°C. The morning looked okay, however – cold, with strong winds, but snow not forecast to start falling until later on.

folage

Photo credit: A-level photography students

Rather than put off a decision until the morning, I thought that families and students deserved as much notice as possible so that they could make arrangements. I sent emails to key senior staff, spoke on the phone to one of our site team, organised contact with the bus companies and consulted the Chair of Governors. I then notified all staff via email of the plan for the next day. At 8pm on Wednesday we notified families that we would be open in the morning, but closing early at 1:10pm. I decided that this was the best compromise: we could still get four lessons worth of learning done, but students and staff should be able to get home safely.

Why not close for the whole day? Because there was a chance to get some meaningful learning done, and closure has to be a last resort. Why not stay open for the whole day? Because, in my judgment, the risks of staying open at that point outweighed the benefits.

In the end, school closure is a judgment call. This week, I had to make that call – and I did so, as with all my decisions, in the best interests of the students and the staff of the Academy. Whilst I’m sure not everyone will agree with me, I hope you at least understand my reasoning.

Stay safe, stay warm and – if you can – enjoy the snow.

reflection 2