Art Works of the Week 2019

Each week the Art Department displays a student’s work on the screens in school. We often include them in the newsletter too. I am always so impressed by the creativity and skill our students show in these works. As we approach the end of the academic year, I thought it was worth gathering them together for posterity. Enjoy!

art work 11th january Ronja Carlsonart work 19th November 2018 Jasmine Sweeting_art work 21st january Brooke RawlinsArt work 21st Septembe Francesca Kellaway HarveyArt work Alida Vetrugno 5th November 2018_art work Bori Gunyits 18th March 2019Art work Grace Hill March 2018Art work helena Avci april 22nd 2019art work Issy Pamment 7th January 2019art work of the week 14th September Daisy Wraight.Art work of the week Lorna Houghton February 4th 2019art work Sophie Smith 23rd October 2018Art work. Amy Hurst 1st December 2018Art work. Charlotte Spensley Dec 10th 2018

Child Soldiers, by Ailís Phillips (7WKH)

This is a student contribution to the Headteacher’s Blog by Ailís Phillips, 7WKH, with the theme of kindness. If you are a student at Churchill Academy & Sixth Form and you want to contribute to the Headteacher’s Blog, visit the Contributions page.

You probably think that war is terrible, but that it is something done by adults in far away countries and has nothing to do with children, like us.

Well I thought so too until I read a news article about child soldiers. You might think this was a one-off; just a particularly awful story. I investigated a little bit further and discovered it wasn’t as rare as I first thought.

Myths and statistics

The name ‘child soldiers’ is not exactly accurate as, though many do fight, some are used as messengers, porters, cooks, spies or for sexual purposes. There are many other myths surrounding ‘child soldiers’ such.

  • Myth: child soldiers are only used in Africa.
  • Reality: the UN estimated in 2016 that there were 20 conflict zones around the world that involved children
  • Myth: that all child soldiers are boys
  • Reality: 30-40% of child soldiers are girls
  • Myth: that children are all are forced to be child soldiers
  • Reality: although many are (especially by ISIS), some are lured by promises of education and/or money.

Not only is being a child soldier a terrible experience when it happens, but it will affect the children for the rest of their lives. Many will not be accepted back into their communities,  particularly in cases where a girl has had a baby with a soldier.

 

What can you do?

Although there isn’t much we can do to help directly, we can raise money and fund-raise or donate money to charities campaigning to end the problem of using children as soldiers, and to support ex-child soldiers. Two great charities working in this area are Child Soldiers International  and Warchild – as both help those affected.

I reached out to these charities by raising awareness of the problem, and now I invite you to do the same, to help other children who have never had the chance at life you had. Help them live the life that is being taken away from them and support others that do.

Living a life with epilepsy, by Jemma Bisdee

This is a student contribution to the Headteacher’s Blog by Jemma Bisdee, 11WCJC, with the theme of determination. If you are a student at Churchill Academy & Sixth Form and you want to contribute to the Headteacher’s Blog, visit the Contributions page.

When people hear the word “Epilepsy” they immediately think of seizures, medication but it is truly more than that. A life with epilepsy is not an easy life. But it is a life I wouldn’t change for anything. All my life I wondered what it was like to be “Normal”. I thought I could never lead the life I wanted with epilepsy. But I now realise how wrong I was to think that.

I used to struggle academically because I never had the support I needed. I felt like nobody would ever truly accept me for who I was because of my lifelong condition. I was at rock bottom, and I felt like there was no where to go. Then I finally realised that life is a gift and I shouldn’t let a condition get me down. I define who I am, not my epilepsy. I moved to Churchill Academy in 2016 in hope of support for who I truly was and for my condition. I can honestly say Churchill Academy has given me have a whole new lease of life. They taught me how to live a life to remember and at school you learn multiple lessons. Maths, English, Science and many more. But the best lesson Churchill Academy has ever taught me is how to love myself. Because of that I am forever grateful.

Living with epilepsy has taught me that in life you get thrown challenges. They can either make or break you. I’m happy to say that my experience with epilepsy has taught me that we are all warriors fighting our own battles. But as long as you stay true to who you are, you will come out the winner. My last seizure was six years ago but although physically epilepsy has not always challenged me, mentally it is a constant battle. But I can say I’m epileptic and proud, and whether its epilepsy or any other condition, it does not define who you are. Only you can do that. We are human beings, we are all beautiful in our own way. I hope that everyone can see that a condition does not change that. If you want something in life fight for it, because life is precious and it is a gift like no other.

To everyone who has supported me throughout my journey I can never thank you enough. My friends, my family and the staff at Churchill Academy. I am grateful for the life I have been given, and no matter what my condition holds in the future. Epilepsy is a way of life, but it’s a life I wouldn’t trade for the world. The world is your oyster, so go and grab it.

For more information about Epilepsy, visit the Epilepsy Society or Epilepsy Action.